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20121101
20121130
SHOW
Q & A 12
STATION
CSPAN 12
LANGUAGE
English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 8:00pm EST
-fashioned, back to the time of the revolution. it is an exit in new hampshire, an hour's drive north of boston. i went there as a student myself. i graduated in 1975. a few years ago, my son started as a student. that first year he was there, there was a position for a math teacher open. my wife was teaching math in the d.c. area. she got that position. we have now lived there for our sixth school year now. a lot of famous people have gone there. john irving, dan brown, among writers. daniel webster. political figures. it has been around a long time. >> you say in your book that daniel webster did not like storeseward. >> yes. there were some instances where they worked together. when seward and arrived in washington as a senator, he has quite a bit of sway over president taylor. webster was trying to get a position for his son. he seeks seward's help. >> after that school, what is next, >> i went back west to stanford university for an undergraduate. i came back east to graduate school, harvard, law and public policy. i came back to washington. >> you worked in politics? where? >> my most politi
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 6:00am EST
chicago and mitt romney in boston. plus key house and senate concession speeches throughout the country. throughout the night, your reaction over the phone and e- mail and twitter. live coverage begins at 8:00 p.m. eastern on the c-span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> this week on "q&a," author walter stahr discusses "seward: lincoln's indispensable man." why did you start your book with the following -- >> i considered other possible introductions. i thought about starting the book at the moment where he learned he would not be the republican nominee. i thought about starting the book with his graduation address. in the end, nothing was as compelling as that night in which president lincoln dies and seward comes within an inch of his life as well. he sent two men to kill secretary seward. they knew exactly where he was. they knew he could not fight back. one of the assassins outside, they guarded the door. he tells the servant he is bringing madison to seward and has to give it to them pers
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 8:00pm EST
outside boston and finally were re-united with all the paper records of the kent library and given by the family to the library in the 1970's. it's taken a long time for their contents to be revealed, and that's mainly because the work is extremely painstaking. it's hard to hear, it's hard to write out transcripts. and i make a point of saying i'm guessing at some of these words. the official document is the tape recording, not the written version. we're just guessing. all of us -- sometimes two people are speaking at the same time and you just do your best. but also, it was necessary that our national archives professionals listened to make sure classified information was not being unnecessarily released. so there's a classification process and then a declassification process, and it just takes a long time. but now all known tapes are in the j.f.k. library and all of them have been released into the public records. so it's a good story. >> how much of it will we never hear? >> we don't know. we don't know what didn't make it to the kennedy library. but everything that is in the ke
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 11:00pm EST
for general electric, and he now teaches up in boston. >> wasn't his father also well known? i learned this from you, but thousand how did they fit into the path? >> my parents and grandparents are amazing people. i feel very lucky. >> what did they do? >> my grandfather was a completely self--made man. his father actually killed himself in 1929 after the stock market crashed and he was left sort of alone to fend for his family, and he went to school, found his way into law school, and started out as a lawyer and then ended up running the northwest railroad and a number of businesses in chicago. he was very civic-minded, too. his advisors, president johnson and others. i think my dad and i sort of inherited a lot of his social beliefs, and i think i carry eye lot of that with the film making that i do for sure. >> why did you decide to study at dartmouth? >> i didn't know what i wanted to do with my life. i didn't have a lot of direction. i played sports in college. i had always been fascinated by history. i had been fascinated by the civil war. i love history. i try to learn from the
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 11:00pm EST
. this was in the boston public library. i was moderating a panel. he was on it. let's take a look at mr. david herbert donald. >> tell us about your feelings about biography. >> i guess i do biography because i am frustrated novelist and i do not have very much in the wake of originality. i cannot create plots and cannot create new characters. on the other hand, i like to think that i can take a historical character and try to bring him or her to life. it is in essence a kind of attempt at history -- it does not always succeed. >> what did you learn from each other? >> i find that very interesting. i will tell you a little story -- when i started with theodore roosevelt, i showed him the first chapter, maybe two or three chapters, a while back. he liked it, but said, you have not brought him to life. i said, what do you mean? he said, you have to tell stories. and he did not use the word novelistic, but i went back and did a lot of rewriting on at theodore roosevelt to bring this boisterous, larger-than-life character best -- back to live in a book called "lion in the white house." i started with trum
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)